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Dimensions: Using Revit dimensions to equally space elements

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Wednesday, 21 March 2012 17:01

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this short article we will take a quick look at how Revit's dimension tool can be used to equally space parts of your design, as required. No theory, let's just dive straight in with a practical example.

Let's draw a simple shell of a building.....

Now let's say we want to quickly divide this shell up into 5 equal compartments- they could be apartments, etc. Rather than working out the spacing between each party wall, we can use Revit's dimension tool to quickly align our party walls at equal spacings. First of all simply drop four party walls into the shell- do NOT worry about the spacing of the walls.....

As you can see in the above image, there is no way that these are equally spaced. But they WILL be in a minute, due to the power of Revit's dimnesioning tools.

Let's go and drop an aligned dimension between all the walls. You'll find this tool on the Annotate > Dimenision tab....

Read more: Dimensions: Using Revit dimensions to equally space elements

   

UK Construction Professional: Can you help with a BIM Survey?

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Monday, 19 March 2012 12:56

One of our new Forum Members (Damien) is udertaking a Dissertation on the value of BIM to the UK Construction Industry. As part of his research, Damien has set up a free online survey. If you are a Construction Professional based in the UK, Damien would REALLY appreciate it if you could spare 2 minutes to complete the survey. Many thanks

The direct link to the survey is HERE

   

Linked Files: Reference Types

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Monday, 02 January 2012 21:59

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this tutorial we are going to take a look at the two different types of referencing systems (Reference Types) that you can use when linking one Revit project into another. This system is the same no matter what combination of Revit projects files you link. ie Revit MEP into Revit Architecture, Revit Structure into MEP, etc.

 


The two Reference Types that are available to you when linking Revit files are: Overlay and Attachment. In order to keep this tutorial to a reasonable length and to convey the concept as efficiently as possible, I am going to demonstrate the difference between the two Reference Types by means of a worked example.

Read more: Linked Files: Reference Types

   

Linked Files: The Basics

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Sunday, 01 January 2012 21:28

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this article we are going to take a look at the basics of linking files in Revit. For the purpose of this exercise we are going to use Revit Architecture 2012, but the same principles can be applied to all flavours of Revit- e.g. Revit Architecture, Revit Structure and Revit MEP. You can also mix and match. I.e. you can link one Revit Architecture file into a another one or you can link a Revit MEP file into Revit Architecture file, and so on.

 

 

Before we actually start with the tutorial, let's just take a few minutes to discuss why we would actually want to link one Revit file into another. Generally there are two main scenarios where you would want to to do this. The first one being when you want to split your project into a "site file" and a "building file". This helps keep each one smaller and also helps with collaboration. This would proabbly be appropriate when either of the files is large in size or you are developing a "campus" model- ie a site with many different buildings on it.

 

Read more: Linked Files: The Basics

   

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