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Walls: Applying Functions to Compound Layers

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this article we will introduce the concept of Compound Layers within Revit Wall structures. Specifically, we will look at the 5 hard-wired Layer Functions (6 if you count the “Membrane” layer which typically has a thickness of 0). And to round off we will take a look at how the “Priority” system works, with regards the Layer Functions. If you are very new to Revit, I would strongly suggest you take a quick look at this article first, which gives a basic overview of Walls within Revit Architecture.

 

In real life walls are very rarely built-up from a single layer of material. Normally, they consist of many layers, each of a different material and performing a different function. Some layers are there to form a structural support for floors or roofs, other layers serve to form an insulation or moisture barrier function.

Read more: Walls: Applying Functions to Compound Layers

 

Revit Architecture 2013 Certified Professional Exam: My experience

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A few weeks ago (Wednesday 7 November to be exact) I undertook the Revit Architecture 2013 Certified Professional Examination. I just wanted to share my personal experience of the test, for the benefit of any of you who are contemplating taking it.

 
 
Now I need to start off by saying that I am "not" going to tell you any of the specific questions or answers that are in the test! This is just a general summary of what to expect if you do go ahead and undertake the exam.
 

Color Schemes

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

I’m going to start this article by saying that it feels a bit odd typing “Color” instead of “Colour”, but despite me being physically located in the West Midlands (United Kingdom) Revit still insists on the American spelling of the word. Which is fine by me!

 

With that out of the way let’s get started with Color Schemes. Have you ever needed to produce architectural plans for a presentation, where you need different rooms / spaces to be colour-coded? Well that’s exactly what “Color Schemes” are for.

 

 

 

There is a pre-requisite to using Colour Schemes- and that is, you need to base them on “Rooms” or “Areas”. That is, before setting up a Color Scheme, you need to have added Revit “Rooms” or Revit “Areas” to you model. For the purposes of this exercise I am going to use “Rooms” as the basis for my Color Scheme. The principle for using them with Areas is very similar. Any problems, please ask on our Forums and we can take you through it.

Read more: Color Schemes

   

Modelling flat roofs that are not quite flat

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

The term “flat roof” can be a bit of an anomaly- because the majority of flat roofs are not quite flat. They are either built–up off an inclined sub-structure (ie the roof joists are slightly inclined, or firing pieces are added to them) or the insulation layer is tapered, to provide a slight fall (ie as with tapered cork insulation).

So how does all this relate to Revit? As you probably well know, Revit has the ability to define a flat roof element, comprised of different material layers. By default, each layer in this “sandwich” is of a uniform thickness. Consequently, the whole assembly has a completely horizontal top and bottom surface.

Read more: Modelling flat roofs that are not quite flat

 

New Blog: Revit LT

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As some of you may know, Autodesk have recently released a "light" version of Revit, aptly called "Revit LT". This product is predominantly aimed at the small Practise, and one-man businesses. Basically, any scenario where worksharing and collaboration are not such a priority.

One Blogger, Tony, has taken to focus his site on this new offering. Simply called "Revit LT", this website takes readers through all the specifics of Revit LT.

Although only in it's infancy, the site is slick and very professional in it's presentation. We wish Tony all the VERY best with his blog and look forward to learing a lot more about Revit LT.

You can find the Revit LT website here

   

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