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Openings: Dormer

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we are going to take a look at the how to use the “Openings: Dormer” tool to form an opening in a roof, ready to receive a dormer.

The “Openings: Dormer” tool can be found on the “Home” menu, in the “Openings” ribbon tab….

Read more: Openings: Dormer

 

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Forms: Creating an Extrusion

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we are going to learn how to use the solid form tools in the Conceptual Design Environment, to create a solid extrusion.

 

If you are totally new to the Conceptual Design Environment you may want to read this article before proceeding any further. The format of this article is a step-by-step exercise, that you can follow along with. The actual form that we are creating is relatively unimportant, it is the “process” (or “Work Flow”) that I want you to understand. Once you are comfortable with the process, you can use it create more ambitious forms. And PLEASE remember: If at any point you get stuck or you have a query, just use our Forums. Help is at hand to resolve any issues you may have with this exercise.

 

Read more: Forms: Creating an Extrusion

   

Design Options: Choosing a preferred Option

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

 

In this article we are going to look at what happens once you (or your Client) have chosen a preferred Option (Using Design Options). You can of course just leave all the other options as they are and work on your preferred option. But this is a little messy and unnecessary. A better solution is to unify your preferred option with the main model and then jettison all other design options. This makes it a lot simpler to progress with the development and detailing of your design, whilst also reducing the size and complexity of your Revit Project File. So let’s look at a real world example. (Note: If you are totally new to Design Options, please read this article first)

 

Here are 3 different proposals I have created using Design Options….

 

Read more: Design Options: Choosing a preferred Option

 

View Templates

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we will look at how View Templates can really aid your productivity rate when using Revit. As I’m sure you know by now, there is a huge variety of parameters that control the look and “style” of the views that you create within Revit.

 

 

 

View Templates are a really elegant way of capturing the values of all those settings and then allowing you to create new views based on them. This saves you a lot of time- as without View Templates, you would have to go through each of those parameters again.

Read more: View Templates

   

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