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Model Text: An introduction

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

Welcome to this Revit Zone article on Model Text. In this short tutorial we are going to explain what Model Text is, how and why you would typically use it.

In Revit there is fundamentally "two" types of text object. The first is "Annotation Text" and the second is "Model Text". Annotation text is isued to annotate your views, elements, details, etc. It can be either standalone or "connected" to an object by use of a Leader. The main thing to note about annotation text is that it is "view-specific". It only exists in the view in which it is created.

Read more: Model Text: An introduction

 

OK, OK! So you didn't like the new name!

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After all the work it would seem that a lot of people prefer Revit Zone to revit.biz!

I have been getting quite a few emails over the last week asking why I am rebranding the site to revit.biz. The only answer I can give to that is because it seemed a cool name to me. But there seems to be a concensus that (from the emails I have received), people generally like the name Revit Zone and had got used to it. And as I am one for feedback, I have listened and decided to change the name back- but keep the new look site! (If that's OK with you guys?!). If nothing else, I sincerely hope you like the look of the new site and find it a bit easier than the old Revit Zone, in terms of navigation.

Apologies to all of you who have either linked to the revit.biz domain name or mentioned the change to revit.biz in your blogs. But the deal's off! We're staying as Revit Zone (definitely!). Please ensure your bookmarks and links point only to the revitzone.com domain name.

Until Sunday 7th March, Revit Zone can still be accessed via the revit.biz domain name. This will give everyone who has bookmarked or linked to the site, the opportunity to read this message and revise their links accordingly. On Sunday 7th March, the revit.biz domain name alias will be removed from the web server- ie it will no longer bring you to Revit Zone! Please also remember to update your RSS Feed by re-subscribing using the link at the base of the Home Page.

 

Get the latest updates on Twitter

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We're all busy- I know that as well as anyone. So if you want notifications of the latest content on Revit Zone (and other Revit sites), just Follow me on Twitter.

 

Join over 2,700 Revit & BIM enthusiasts who receive links to the best Revit content on the net- from a wide variety of sources.

 

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Design Options: Choosing a preferred Option

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

 

In this article we are going to look at what happens once you (or your Client) have chosen a preferred Option (Using Design Options). You can of course just leave all the other options as they are and work on your preferred option. But this is a little messy and unnecessary. A better solution is to unify your preferred option with the main model and then jettison all other design options. This makes it a lot simpler to progress with the development and detailing of your design, whilst also reducing the size and complexity of your Revit Project File. So let’s look at a real world example. (Note: If you are totally new to Design Options, please read this article first)

 

Here are 3 different proposals I have created using Design Options….

 

Read more: Design Options: Choosing a preferred Option

 

Forms: Creating a Loft form

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we are going to take a look at how to create a solid Loft form, from within the Conceptual Design Environment. If you are totally new to the Conceptual Design Environment (or CDE) within Revit, I suggest that you may wish to read this article first.

 

 

A Loft form is basically two or more profiles that have been blended together. The easiest way to explain this is by a quick example. I’m going to start with a “New Conceptual Mass”- and I’m going to use the “Metric Mass” template.

 

Read more: Forms: Creating a Loft form

   

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