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Forms: Creating a Sweep

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

 

In this article we are going to look at how to create a solid Sweep form, from within the Conceptual Design Environment. If you are totally new to the Conceptual Design Environment (or CDE) within Revit, I suggest that you may wish to read this article first.

 

 

 

A Sweep is a 3D form that is created when you “sweep” a 2D profile along a 3D path. Along with “Extrusion” it is one of the most useful ways of creating 3D geometry within Revit. You’ll find yourself using it time and again.

Read more: Forms: Creating a Sweep

 

Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 5

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

 

Welcome to the fifth part in this series of articles in which we explain how to create your own Door Family using the Family Editor, in Revit Architecture. If you have missed the previous parts in this series, you may wish to start here.

In this article we are going to concentrate on creating a door handle. In doing so, we are going to talk about the concept of “nested components”. We will talk about what they are, how you create them and what the advantages are in using them.

So let’s just dive in to the whole topic of “Nested Components”. The term “Nested Component” is simply used to describe

one Family that is loaded in to another Family. For example, we are about to create a new “door handle” component, that we will then load into our Door family.

Read more: Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 5

 

Legends: An overview

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this article we will take a quick overview of Legends, within Revit. Legend views are common to all flavours of Revit (Revit Architecture, Revit MEP and Revit Structure)- so once you can use it in one flavour, you’ll be conversant with it in the others. For the sake of clarity I should point out that in this article we are talking about “Legend Views” and not “Colour Legends”. So what is a Legend? Simply put, it is a way of displaying a list of various model components and annotations used in a project.

 

Legends fall into 3 main types. These are as follows:-

 

Read more: Legends: An overview

   

Roofs: Roof by Extrusion

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

Most people's first experience of Roofs within Revit Architecture is by means of the "Roof by Footprint" tool. This is absolutely the right tool for the job when you need to create either a flat roof or a pitched roof. But what about if you want to create a curved roof. Well, fear not: Revit has just the tool for the job; and it the "Roof by Extrusion" tool.


In this short tutorial we are going to use this tool to create a curved, barrel vault roof over a simple rectangular building.

So first of all let's create a building for the roof to sit on! We are going to keep the form of the building really simple- we are interested in the fundamental concepts and not architectural merit.

Read more: Roofs: Roof by Extrusion

 

New issue of AUGI / AEC Edge now available!

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We always like it when a new AEC Edge is published. It's a brilliant read and normally packed with really useful information- and the latest edition does not break from that tradition in any way.

If you really want to keep upto spped with all the latest news, tips and general info on your favourite AEC soiftware, make sure you check out the SPring 2010 Edition of AEC Edge. Oh, and it's FREE!!!!

Download the Spring 2010 edition of AEC Edge here

   

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