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Matchlines

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

Welcome to the Revit Zone article on Matchlines. In this article we are going to take a look at what Matchlines are, within Revit. We are going to show you how to produce them and also when you would want to use them.

So what exactly are Matchlines? Matchlines are basically sketch lines that are used to show where a view is split. Matchlines are most commonly used in conjunction with "Dependent Views". If you are yet conversent with "Dependent Views" in Revit, you can find a couple of introductory articles HERE and HERE.

Read more: Matchlines

 

Walls: Extending individual layers

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this tutorial we will take a look at Revit's "Layer Extensions" in Vertical Compound Walls. As you know, Walls are a System Family in Revit- where you then create as many Types as you wish. A Compound Wall is built up of one or more "Layers"- each having a user-definable Function (ie Structure, Thermal Layer, etc).

When you first start playing with Walls in Revit, you are most likely not aware of just how powerful (and configureable) they actually are. For example, you may assume that every wall simply has a Bottom and Top Constraint and that all layers in the "vertical sandwich" must have the same top and bottom constraints?
 

AECBytes: Revit Architecture 2011 Review

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I know it's been out for a while now, but any review of Revit Architecture 2011 is still very welcome. So I am pleased to be able to post a link to the excellent review over at AECBytes

The article is very comprehensive and covers all the major improvements and new features to be found in Autodesk's latest iteration.

Read the entire article here

   

New Revit Article over at BIMscape.com

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Most of my new articles will be published over at my other site, BIMscape.com. Rest assured that I am still producing new Revit articles- the target is to get one new article out to you guys per day. Today I have just published an article on a really slick way to depict the position of your overhead elements, in plan views using the Linework tool. The article can be found here

To make it easy to keep up with new content, I produce a monthly BIM Newsletter which contains links to all the new articles. If you'd like to receive this Newsletter, just put your email address in the box on the upper left of this site.

 

The Newsletters are handled by the MailChimp service and you have my word that your email address remains strictly with me and MailChimp. You can UnSubscribe at any time. And unlike some sites I personally subscribe to, my Newsletter is monthly- I am not going to fill you InBox with emails each day!

 

 

 

View Range explained

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Stop! Before you go any further into this article, by far the easiest way to understand Revit's View Range settings is to watch my YouTube video tutorial. Of course you're more than welcome to read the article below. But a narrated video paints a thousand words!

 

 

If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

View Range is a concept that you will get your head around (hopefully!) sooner or later. So why don’t we make it “Sooner”? Once you are comfortable in controlling the various parameters contained within the View Range control panel, you’ll be able to easily manipulate exactly what is displayed in your Plan & Reflected Ceiling Views.

 

 

In the usual “Revit Zone style”, we’ll deal with the concept by means of a worked example. So what I’m going to do first is set up a very simple building with some key levels in it. We will then talk about the View Range control panel and what each of the parameters does. And finally, we’ll change the values of these parameters to demonstrate the effect they have on the Plan View.

Read more: View Range explained

   

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