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Forms: Creating a Surface

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we are going to take a look at how to create a Surface form, from within the Conceptual Design Environment. If you are totally new to the Conceptual Design Environment (or CDE) within Revit, I suggest that you may wish to read this article first.

 

 

In other articles we have looked at how to create solid 3D forms such as Lofts, Sweeps and Revolves. But we can also use the “Create Form > Solid Form” tool to create a solid planar surface.

 

Compared with the other solid forms we have looked at, this one is by far the easiest to create- which means this article is going to be pretty short!.

Read more: Forms: Creating a Surface

 

Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 6

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

Welcome to the sixth part in this series of articles in which we explain how to create your own Door Family using the Family Editor, in Revit Architecture. If you have missed the previous parts in this series, you may wish to start here.

If you have been following the series from the start, you will know that we have now completed the modelling part of the exercise. That is to say, we have created all the 3D geometry that is required to represent our door assembly- including the door handles.

To get the maximum value out of the time we have spent modelling this door, we can go ahead and easily create a number of pre-defined “Types”, all based on the same basic family. Needless to say, that is the focus of this particular article: Types.

Read more: Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 6

 

Matchlines

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

Welcome to the Revit Zone article on Matchlines. In this article we are going to take a look at what Matchlines are, within Revit. We are going to show you how to produce them and also when you would want to use them.

So what exactly are Matchlines? Matchlines are basically sketch lines that are used to show where a view is split. Matchlines are most commonly used in conjunction with "Dependent Views". If you are yet conversent with "Dependent Views" in Revit, you can find a couple of introductory articles HERE and HERE.

Read more: Matchlines

   

Sheet Sets

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here
Welcome to this Revit Zone article on Sheet Sets. In this short article we will show you how to create Sheet Sets. Although a relatively simple concept in the context of Revit's power and complexity, Sheet Sets are a really useful productivity tool that will speed up your output with regards printed material of PDF's.
Please note that the concept of Sheet Sets is universal in the world of Revit- ie it is applicable to Revit Architecture,Revit MEP and Revit Structure.
 

Walls: Extending individual layers

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this tutorial we will take a look at Revit's "Layer Extensions" in Vertical Compound Walls. As you know, Walls are a System Family in Revit- where you then create as many Types as you wish. A Compound Wall is built up of one or more "Layers"- each having a user-definable Function (ie Structure, Thermal Layer, etc).

When you first start playing with Walls in Revit, you are most likely not aware of just how powerful (and configureable) they actually are. For example, you may assume that every wall simply has a Bottom and Top Constraint and that all layers in the "vertical sandwich" must have the same top and bottom constraints?
   

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