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Linked Files: The Basics

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this article we are going to take a look at the basics of linking files in Revit. For the purpose of this exercise we are going to use Revit Architecture 2012, but the same principles can be applied to all flavours of Revit- e.g. Revit Architecture, Revit Structure and Revit MEP. You can also mix and match. I.e. you can link one Revit Architecture file into a another one or you can link a Revit MEP file into Revit Architecture file, and so on.

 

 

Before we actually start with the tutorial, let's just take a few minutes to discuss why we would actually want to link one Revit file into another. Generally there are two main scenarios where you would want to to do this. The first one being when you want to split your project into a "site file" and a "building file". This helps keep each one smaller and also helps with collaboration. This would proabbly be appropriate when either of the files is large in size or you are developing a "campus" model- ie a site with many different buildings on it.

 

Read more: Linked Files: The Basics

 

Walls: Stacked Walls

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this tutorial, I am going to show you how to create a basic Stacked Wall in Revit Architecture. But before we get into the detail, I am going to give a quick explanation as to exactly what a Stacked Wall is.

In the context of Revit Architecture, a Stacked Wall is quite simply a Wall made up of different "Wall Types" stacked vertically on top of each other.
A simple example would be an external wall where you have a plinth base (let's say Engineering Brick) with a cladded wall above.
 

Are your Levels Black or Blue?

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Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

Ever wondered why most of your Level Heads are Blue, whilst the odd one or two are Black?

 

Then let me explain....

 

   

AECBytes: Using Worksets to Help Improve Large Model Performance in Revit

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At some point or other, you are going to prodcue a Revit model that is VERY big! And when that happens, there's a very good chance that the performance of Revit will start to creak. There are various things that you can do to help in this situation- one of them being the use of Worksets to reduce the working model size. AECBytes has a great article which discusses this very concept.

"The idea behind leveraging worksets to enhance performance is to break down a model into different categories and place elements of those categories into their respective worksets. In addition, every Revit link must have its own workset as well as a workset for all CAD links."

Read the entire article here

 

New for 2016: "The Complete Beginners Guide to Autodesk Revit Architecture" Course

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The most comprehensive, in-depth and complete Beginner's Guide to Autodesk Revit Architecture; to be found anywhere! If you like the teaching style of the tutorials here at Revit Zone, you'll enjoy all 84 parts of my FREE online Course over at BIMscape.com. Some people prefer to read their tutorials, some like to watch them- so I've provided both mediums. Read AND watch every aspect that a novice needs to know about the world's no.1 BIM-authoring software.

 

For full details of this FREE 84 part video & written tutorial course, please click here

 

Enjoy the course!

Kind regards,

Ian

   

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