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Walls: Stacked Walls

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In this tutorial, I am going to show you how to create a basic Stacked Wall in Revit Architecture. But before we get into the detail, I am going to give a quick explanation as to exactly what a Stacked Wall is.

 
 
In the context of Revit Architecture, a Stacked Wall is quite simply a Wall made up of different "Wall Types" stacked vertically on top of each other.
A simple example would be an external wall where you have a plinth base (let's say Engineering Brick) with a cladded wall above.
 
Now, I can almost hear some of you saying "Simple. I'll just draw the plinth base with one wall- set a new Level to match the top of the plinth and then trace around the plinth with a new wall type, to create the upper section. YES, you can do it that way- but it's not the most elegant (or appropriate) solution. So let's do it properly!
 
The main thing to keep in mind is that Stacked Walls are their own specific "System Family"- distinct from Compound Walls and Curtain Walls.
 
Let's begin by duplicating an existing Stacked Wall Type, which we can then modify accordingly. So to start with choose the "Wall" tool
 
 
From the drop-down list of wall types, choose the existing "Stacked Wall 1" wall type.
 
 
You now need to "Edit Type" in order to be able to "Duplicate" it. I am going to accept the default name of "Stacked Wall 2" for my duplicate.....
 
 
Now that have created a new "Type" for us to experiment with, we can start editing it's structure. If you've closed all the dialogue boxes, select your wall type again and choose "Edit Type". The interesting thing to note here is that the "Type Properties" panel for Stacked Walls is VERY sparse! It only contains one parameter and that is "Structure"- which has an associated "Edit" button next to it.......
 
 
Let's go ahead and Edit the Structure. As with the "Type Properties" dialogue box, the "Edit Assembly" panel is both sparse and different when compared with the equivalent settings panel for Compound Walls....
 
 
In my opinion, this is a very clear, straightforward control panel. It simply shows the different wall types that are in your Stacked Wall Type. In this panel, you can rearrange the vertical order of the constituent wall types. You can add or remove wall types and you can also set the heights for each wall type.
 
Let's go ahead and add a brick plinth to the base of our wall. To do this hit "Insert"- Revit will add a new row to the list. You will now have to select which wall type you want by using the drop-down list in the first column of the new row. I'm going to choose "Ext- 215 - Brick"......
 
 
If you haven't done so already, enable the Preview window by hitting the "Preview" button located near the bottom of the "Edit Assembly" panel. In the preview window, we can clearly see the new wall type added to the base of the wall......
 
 
Note: Our new inserted wall type has come in with a height of 3000mm. Let's change that to 300mm....
 
 
I'm now going to change the middle Wall Type (ie row number 2) to "Cav 50 100 200 Cladding".......
 
 
And finally I'm going to remove the Compound Wall Type on Row number 1, as we don't need it. Simply select the first row and hit "Delete". Your Preview Window should now look like this.....
 
 
Now just one thing that I want you to note before we take a look at our Stacked Wall in all it's 3D glory- If we take a look at the two rows (one for each of our Compound Wall Types) in the "Edit Assembly" panel, you will notice that the top row has a height shown as "Variable"......
 
 
No matter how may layers you add to your Stacked Wall Type, ONE of them MUST have a "Variable" height. This is so that when you are using this wall type in your models, it can automatically vary it's height according to "Top" and "Base" constraints. OK, let's take a look at our finished Wall Type......
 
 
And that ends this simple tutorial on Stacked Wall in Revit Architecture. As you've seen, they are really easy to set up but will save you a considerable amount of time if your are designing a large building which contains these type of wall assemblies.

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